University of São Paulo: Low Cost Solar Heating [September Meetings Part 02]

University of São Paulo: Low Cost Solar Heating [September Meetings Part 02]

On September 11th, the University of São Paulo researcher Artur V. Cordeiro visited the president of the non-governmental organization Sociedade do Sol, Gustavo Cherubina, in an effort to develop partnerships for the APIS project and to learn about the organization’s low cost solar heating system (LCSH).

Developed in Brazil by Augustin T. Woelz, José Ângelo Contini and Pedro L. Anselmo in 1992, the LCSH is made with modular PVC ceiling board, water pipes, water tanks and black paint. It has the potential to heat water to about 50ºC (122ºF).

According to Mr. Cherubina, the APIS project could employ an estimated 20 heating boards — two rows of 10 — located on the north side of the container.

The low cost solar heater system (LCSH) (photo: Artur V. Cordeiro).

The low cost solar heater system (LCSH) (photo: Artur V. Cordeiro).

The heating panels (photo: Artur V. Cordeiro)

The heating panels (photo: Artur V. Cordeiro)

On the morning of September 22nd, Prof. Lara Leite Barbosa and Artur V. Cordeiro met with Prof. José Carlos Mierzwa from Polytechnic School of the University of São Paulo, and Marcio Romeiro, a trade representative with Invict, a company that supplies filters for water and sewage treatment. As it relates to the APIS Project, the group discussed water supply, quantity and location of water pumps, power consumption, dimensions of the treatment unit, waste water and water heating alternatives.

As discussed in Part One of these September meetings, water supply remains a critical aspect of the design and success of the project. During this meeting, consideration was narrowed to capturing the water from a local river with a submersed pump and a flexible pipe to deliver it to the membrane filtration system.

Wastewater will be separated and treated in two ways. The “blackwater” (aka sewage) will be collected in on-site storage tanks and taken to municipal treatment facilities. The “greywater” (water generated from wash hand basins and showers) will be filtered and sent back to the river.

If solar energy is unavailable, gasoline generators could provide backup power to on-site water boilers – an expensive, but potentially viable alternative.

The conclusion of this meeting determined that the LCSH was the preferred option for the APIS project. Gustavo Cherubina and the Sociedade do Sol will continue to collaborate on the project by providing design expertise and solar panel donations.

Floor plan revision, September 22nd. The red area is reserved for the water treatment system (drawing: Adriana Lima).

Floor plan revision, September 22nd. The red area is reserved for the water treatment system (drawing: Adriana Lima).

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